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» Training

This page informs about forthcoming trainings, including summer school courses, general lectures and methodological seminars. Green ticks indicate that the training event is still open for application / registration.

Regenstrief Center for Health Services Research

Title: Configurational Research with Qualitative Comparative Analysis (QCA) and Coincidence Analysis (CNA)

Date: 25-29 September, 2017

Place:Indianapolis, Indiana (USA)

Description: This seminar offers an intensive 5-day introduction for health researchers to Qualitative Comparative Analysis (QCA) and Coincidence Analysis (CNA) - the two most prominent configurational comparative methods (CCMs) of causal discovery. Participants will be guided through the nuts and bolts of configurational comparative data analysis as well as cutting-edge methodological innovations. In replicating published studies from various areas of the health sciences, they will also learn how to make the most of current software for QCA and CNA.

Fees: $550–$750USD

Instructors: Michael Baumgartner (University of Geneva), Alrik Thiem (University of Geneva)

Link: Course details

Global School in Empirical Research Methods (GSERM Ljubljana)

Title: Qualitative Comparative Analysis

Date: 28 Aug-01 Sep 2017

Place: University of Ljubljana

Description: One week course on QCA and fuzzy sets.

Fees: 900CHF (Early bird discount -150 CHF through 30 Apr)

Instructors: Charles C. Ragin

Link: Course details

12th ECPR Summer School in Methods and Techniques, Budapest

Title: Qualitative Comparative Analysis and Fuzzy Sets

Date: 31 July - 11 August 2017 (30 hours)

Place: Central European University, Budapest (Hungary)

Description: This course introduces participants to set-theoretic methods and their application in the social sciences with a focus on Qualitative Comparative Analysis. The introductory course is complemented by an advanced course that is taught at the ECPR Winter School in Bamberg. The course starts out by familiarizing students with the basic concepts of the underlying methodological perspective, among them the central notions of necessity and sufficiency, formal logic and Boolean algebra. From there, we move to the logic and analysis of truth tables and discuss the most important problems that emerge when this analytical tool is used for exploring social science data. Right from the beginning, students will be exposed to performing set-theoretic analyses with the relevant R software packages. When discussing set-theoretic methods, in-class debates will engage on broad, general comparative social research issues, such as case selection principles, concept formation, questions of data aggregation and the treatment of causally relevant notions of time. Examples are drawn from published applications in the social sciences. Participants are encouraged to bring their own raw data for in-class exercises and assignments, if available.

Fees: 945 € (with early bird + loyalty discount), 995 € (with early bird discount), 1170 € (ECPR members), etc. – see fee structure at https://ecpr.eu/Events/Content.aspx?ID=416&EventID=116. (Early bird discount until 21 April)

Instructors: Patrick A. Mello (Technical University of Munich) and Carsten Schneider (Central European University)

Link: Course details

12th ECPR Summer School in Methods and Techniques, Budapest

Title: Case Study Research: Method and Practice

Date: 31 July - 11 August 2017 (30 hours)

Place: Central European University, Budapest (Hungary)

Description: This course approaches qualitative case studies from the perspective of method and practice. The goal is to understand the advantages and challenges of the case study method and to detail the tasks involved in all stages of the research process. The course has three interrelated components (see day-to-day schedule). First, the lecture/seminar segments introduce a specific topic on a basic and advanced level. Second, “lab sessions” give the participants the opportunity to apply the new insights to their own project; this is achieved by discussions about the participants’ projects in small groups and among the entire class. Third, the assignment portion involves in-class discussions of short assignments (simple methodological questions) related to the participants studies and published case studies from different fields within political science. This helps developing an idea about how case studies are presented and done in empirical research. At the end of the course, participants will be able to implement sound case studies and to critically evaluate published research. The course also covers comparative case studies, advanced issues in comparison, causal inference and generalization.

Fees: 945 € (with early bird + loyalty discount), 995 € (with early bird discount), 1170 € (ECPR members), etc. – see fee structure at https://ecpr.eu/Events/Content.aspx?ID=416&EventID=116. (Early bird discount until 21 April)

Instructors: Ingo Rohlfing (University of Cologne)

Link: Course details

12th ECPR Summer School in Methods and Techniques, Budapest

Title: Seasoned Scholar à la carte workshop: qualitative, interpretive, case-oriented and comparative methods

Date: 27-29 July 2017 (15 hours)

Place: Central European University, Budapest (Hungary)

Description: This ‘à la carte’ methods workshop has been designed for more experienced scholars (criterion: at least PhD + 5 years, and/or at least 10 years research experience, and/or senior academic appointment) who face various needs/challenges in terms of social scientific research methods: for instance (non-limitative list): writing up the methods section of a research project; choosing the adequate method(s) for a funded project they have obtained; arbitrating between different methodological options ; needing to be updated on the recent evolutions of various methods/techniques applicable to their field and topic; getting some assistance for troubleshooting in their own use of methods; getting advice on which methods expert(s) to contact for what; getting advice on which methods training they should send their team members to; getting advice/feedback on a syllabus they are putting together; getting advice on existing teaching syllabi on some methodological topics; etc. Time is a scarce resource for these seasoned scholars, and they seek a time-efficient formula to receive individual advice by senior peers/methodologists. This workshop covers a broad span of ‘qualitative’ methods and technique, in the broad sense, i.e. comprising both constructivist, interpretive and ethnographic approaches as well as more realist and post-positivist approaches to single case studies, small-N and medium-N comparisons. The formula also includes a full ‘package’ of services from March to October 2017.

Fees: 2000 € (ECPR members), 3000 € (non-ECPR members) – see fee structure at https://ecpr.eu/Events/Content.aspx?ID=416&EventID=116.

Instructors: Benoît Rihoux (UCLouvain)

Link: Course details

Methods@Manchester Summer School

Title: Integrated Mixed-Methods Research including QCA

Date: 3–7 July 2017

Place: University of Manchester (UK)

Description: This summer school strand approaches mixed methods from the viewpoint that methods can be integrated not separated at the analysis stage. It focuses on the use of case-studies and the case-study comparative method in mixed-methods research contexts. The content focuses on four topics : (1) mixed methods data management; (2) qualitative comparative analysis (QCA) and the comparative method; (3) fuzzy set analysis of pathways of causality; and (4) methods of using qualitative data to strengthen an argument and make the analysis rigorous and transparent. (…) This one-week event involves 28 hours of contact time of which about 5-6 hours are computer practicals led by the tutors. The computer practicals for QCA include applications of NVIVO, fsQCA, SPSS, and Excel software. (…) The organisation of the course involves lectures, active learning and a project. Each day up to two lectures and one ‘lectorial’ occur.

Fees: 600 £ (students) or 900 £ (others)

Instructors: Wendy Olsen and Stephanie Thomson

Link: Course details

Global School in Empirical Research Methods (GSERM St. Gallen)

Title: Qualitative Comparative Analysis

Date: 19-23 June 2017

Place: Universität St. Gallen

Description: One week course on QCA and fuzzy sets.

Fees: 900CHF (Early bird discount -50CHF through 28 Feb)

Instructors: Charles C. Ragin

Link: Course details

ESRC Research Training

Title: Qualitative Comparative Analysis

Date: 15–16 June 2017

Place: University of Sussex, Falmer, Brighton (UK)

Description: This course provides an introduction to an increasingly popular range of analytic techniques in comparative research, commonly referred to as QCA (Qualitative Comparative Analysis). Based on set theory and formal logic, QCA aims to provide causal generalizations that strike a balance between complexity (inherent in case-oriented approaches) and generalizability (associated with variable-oriented approaches). The aim is to provide a practical understanding of both the crisp-set and fuzzy-set versions of QCA and to examine the main epistemological, methodological and mathematical foundations of these techniques.

Fees: 10 £, 30 £ or 100 £

Instructors: Sabina Avdagic

Link: Course details

Annual Meeting of the Southwestern Social Science Association

Title: Methodology Workshop on Qualitative Comparative Analysis (QCA)

Date: 14 Apr 2017

Place: Hyatt Regency—Austin, TX (United States)

Description: Invented by Charles Ragin in the late-1980s, QCA offers an alternative to conventional statistical methods based on the analysis of set-theoretic relationships and is suitable for small-, medium-, and large-N studies. This workshop will demonstrate the method, examine its strengths and weaknesses, discuss recent developments and extensions, and suggest best practices for conducting QCA. Software for conducting QCA and resources for further study will be reviewed and recommended.

Fees: None

Instructors: Claude Rubinson (University of Houston—Downtown)

Link: Conference Course details

Southern California QCA Workshop

Title: Southern California QCA Workshop

Date: 30 March - 1 April 2017

Place: University of California, Irvine (United States)

Description: The goal of this workshop is to provide a ground-up introduction to Qualitative Comparative Analysis (QCA) and fuzzy sets. Participants will get intensive instruction and hands-on experience with the fsQCA software package and on completion should be prepared to design and execute research projects using the set-theoretic approach. Space is limited.

Fees: $350 ($150 for students)

Instructors: Charles C. Ragin (Univ California, Irvine) and Peer C. Fiss (Univ Southern California)

Links: Course details. For questions, please email fsqca2017@gmail.com.

6th ECPR Winter School in Methods and Techniques

Title: Comparative Research Designs

Date: 6–10 March 2017

Place: University of Bamberg, Germany

Description: The purpose of this course is to provide training on all aspects that enable a researcher to conceive and conduct the most appropriate comparative research design – the latter broadly defined as any research enterprise that comprises at least two ‘cases’ or observations. On the one hand, the course will cover fundamental questions ‘upstream’ of practical and hands-on choices: what is comparison? Why compare; what is the added value of comparison? What should be the ‘mindset’ of a good comparative researcher? What is the link between a research puzzle and the choice for a comparative research design? What would be the alternative(s)? At which level(s) should the ‘cases’ be envisaged? etc. On the other hand, the practicalities of different types of comparative research designs will be examined in detail, by following all the hands-on steps: (1) prior arbitrations and ‘casing’, i.e. the definition of the cases; (2) case selection, through more basic or more advanced strategies; (3) collecting and managing comparative data; (4) comparative data analysis. A short introductory module on QCA (as part of a comparative research design), both as an approach and a set of techniques, is also provided. Lectures and interactive sessions alternate, with ample time for questions/answers, open discussions, and ‘solution-finding’ for the participants’ individual projects.

Fees: €570 (ECPR Members), €875 (non-ECPR members); + possibility of early bird discount (-€100 until 2 Nov 2016) and loyalty discount (-€50); + cheaper option via a €640 ‘package’ also including a short preparatory course

Instructors: Benoît Rihoux (Université catholique de Louvain)

Link: Course details (ECPR Winter School)

6th ECPR Winter School in Methods and Techniques

Title: Advanced Multi-Method Research

Date: 6–10 March 2017

Place: University of Bamberg, Germany

Description: This course deals with multi-method research (MMR) as it is currently developed in political science and sociology (e.g., Lieberman’s nested analysis). The course builds on this development and focuses on the combination of case studies and process tracing with a large-n method and Qualitative Comparative Analysis (QCA) and regression analysis in particular, as these are the most widely used large-n techniques in MMR. The relative emphasis we put on statistical methods and QCA depends on what methods the participants are applying in their own research. Participants combining case studies with another method such as social network analysis or experiments are also welcome. The goal of the course is to understand the different varieties in which MMR can be done. We discuss the unique advantages and methodological and practical challenges confronted in implementing multi-method designs. Topics include concepts in the small-n and the large-n analysis, case selection for process tracing, and the compatibility of theoretical expectations and inferences on causal effects and causal mechanisms. Method-centered discussions are illustrated with examples from different fields of political science and, if possible, the projects the participants are working on. At the end of the course, participants are able to realize their own MMR in a systematic manner and to critically evaluate published MMR studies.

Fees: €570 (ECPR Members), €875 (non-ECPR members); + possibility of early bird discount (-€100 until 2 Nov 2016) and loyalty discount (-€50); + cheaper option via a €640 ‘package’ also including a short preparatory course

Instructors: Ingo Rohlfing (Bremen International Graduate School in the Social Sciences)

Link: Course details (ECPR Winter School)

6th ECPR Winter School in Methods and Techniques

Title: Advanced Topics in Set-Theoretic Methods and QCA

Date: 6–10 March 2017

Place: University of Bamberg, Germany

Description: This course addresses advanced issues that arise if and when scholars embrace notions of sets and their relations. While it is a course about set-theoretic methods writ large, most of the time, we will discuss issues that are specific to Qualitative Comparative Analysis (QCA). Although much effort has been put into developing standards of good practice, still many important issues remain unresolved, and even sometimes unaddressed. This has given rise to a recent wave of literature sceptical of set-methods, in general, and QCA, in particular. In this course we not only discuss the issues raised by theses critiques, but go beyond them and explore the hitherto under-used potentials of set-theoretic methods. Depending on needs and interests of participants, we choose among the following topics: set-theoretic multi-method research; robustness and uncertainty; set-theoretic theory evaluation; enhanced Standard Analysis; time and set-theoretic methods; model ambiguity; and/or two-step QCA.

Fees: €570 (ECPR Members), €875 (non-ECPR members); + possibility of early bird discount (-€100 until 2 Nov 2016) and loyalty discount (-€50); + cheaper option via a €640 ‘package’ also including a short preparatory course

Instructors: Carsten Schneider (CEU Budapest)

Link: Course details (ECPR Winter School)

IPSA-USP Summer School

Title: Advanced Issues in Set-Theoretic Methods and QCA

Date: 6-10 February 2017

Place: Sao Paulo (Brazil)

Description: The purpose of the advanced module is fourfold: (1) to re-visit and further practice the software implementation of the core points of QCA addressed in module 1 (calibration, tests of necessity and sufficiency, truth tables, parameters of fit); (2) to elaborate on further issues that arise when neat formal logical tools and concepts, in particular the issues of limited diversity and the challenge to make good counterfactuals on so-called logical remainders; (3) to get better acquainted with the standards of good practice, both in its fundamental aspects and in using the relevant software programmes; and (4) to spell out from a set-theoretic point of view general methodological issues, such as multi-method research, robustness tests, theory evaluation, and panel data analysis.

Fees: from 275 USD to 825 USD (see http://summerschool.fflch.usp.br/registration-and-fees/registration-fees)

Instructors: Carsten Schneider (Central European University)

Link: More details

Cathie Marsh Institute for Social Research

Title: Fuzzy Set and QCA Analysis

Date: 02 Feb 2017

Place: University of Manchester

Description: Qualitative Comparative Analysis is a systematic method of studying data on multiple comparable cases from about N=8 through to large datasets of N=10,000 etc. The QCA methods firstly involve casing, i.e. delineating cases; secondly organising a systematic data matrix (we will show these in NVIVO and in Excel); thirdly examining sets of cases known as configurations; fourth interpreting these in terms of ‘necessary cause’ and ‘sufficient cause’ of each major outcome of interest. We demonstrate the fsQCA software for QCA. A fuzzy set is a record of the membership score of a case in a characteristic or set. A crisp set is a membership value of 0 (not in the set) or 1 (fully in the set), and thus is a simplified measure compared with a fuzzy set. Fuzzy sets or crisp sets, and combinations, can be used in QCA. All the permutations of the causal factors, known as X variates, are considered one by one. We test whether X is necessary, or sufficient, or both, for an outcome Y. We then augment the standard measures of ‘consistency’. We show that one can generate both within-group and sample-wide consistency levels for testing sufficient cause.

This one-day training course will attract those doing case-study research, those using the comparative research approaches, and those who want to extend their skills in QCA and fuzzy analysis from beginner to intermediate levels. It will suit qualitative researchers with no prior experience, as well as quantitative and mixed-methods researchers; all are welcome.

Fees: £195 (£140 for those from educational, government and charitable institutions).

Instructors: Wendy Olsen (University of Manchester)

Link: Course details

IPSA-USP Summer School

Title: Basics of Set-Theoretic Methods and QCA

Date: 30 January - 3 February 2017

Place: Sao Paulo (Brazil)

Description: The module starts out by familiarising students with the basic concepts of set-theoretic methods. We discuss the two fundamental subset relations of necessity and sufficiency, and introduce the basics of formal logic, set theory, and Boolean algebra. From there, we move to the logic and analysis of truth tables and discuss the most important problems that emerge when this analytic tool is used for analysing social science data. All topics will be introduced using crisp sets and later expanded to fuzzy sets. Right from the beginning, students will be exposed to performing set-theoretic analyses using the relevant R software packages. When discussing set-theoretic methods, in-class debates will further engage on broad, general comparative social research issues, such as case selection principles, concept formation, questions of data aggregation and the treatment of causally relevant notions of time. Real-life published applications are used throughout the course. Participants are encouraged to bring their own data for in-class exercises and assignments, if available.

Fees: from 275 USD to 825 USD (see http://summerschool.fflch.usp.br/registration-and-fees/registration-fees)

Instructors: Carsten Schneider (Central European University)

Link: More details

Global School in Empirical Research Methods (GSERM)

Title: Qualitative Comparative Analysis

Date: 9–13 January 2017

Place: Oslo (Norway)

Description: This course introduces participants to set-theoretic methods and their application in the social sciences with a focus on Qualitative Comparative Analysis. The course starts out by familiarizing students with the basic concepts of the underlying methodological perspective, among them the central notions of necessity and sufficiency, formal logic and Boolean algebra. From there, we move to the logic and analysis of truth tables and discuss the most important problems that emerge when this analytical tool is used for exploring social science data. Right from the beginning, students will be exposed to performing set-theoretic analyses with the relevant R software packages. When discussing set-theoretic methods, in-class debates will engage on broad, general comparative social research issues, such as case selection principles, concept formation, questions of data aggregation and the treatment of causally relevant notions of time. Examples are drawn from published applications in the social sciences. Participants are encouraged to bring their own raw data for in-class exercises and assignments, if available. By the end of the course, participants will be able to perform set-theoretic analyses of their own and to critically evaluate published QCA.

Fees: 900 CHF (Swiss Francs) + possibility of early bird discount (-CHF50 until 31 Oct 2016)

Instructors: Carsten Schneider (CEU Budapest)

Link: More details

ICCS Seminars (Birmingham)

Title: An Introduction to Qualitative Comparative Analysis (QCA) as a Set-Theoretic and Case-Oriented Approach to Comparative Research

Date: 1–4 November 2016

Place: University of Birmingham (UK)

Description: This workshop offers a comprehensive and application-oriented introduction into Qualitative Comparative Analysis (QCA) in its main variants of crisp-set and fuzzy-set QCA. We will focus on both aspects of a) research design or QCA as an approach to study social phenomena as well as b) application or QCA as a technique of analysis. The workshop starts from basic notions of QCA and its core underpinnings of set-theory, configurational thinking, diversity- and case-orientation. In a next step, we further elaborate on the idea of sets in order to operationalize concepts (aka calibration) and discuss different strategies for constructing sets from various forms of data. Following this, we will go through the main analytical sequences of a QCA, i.e. checking for necessary and sufficient (combinations of) conditions, and interpreting the results. In doing so, we will highlight common pitfalls during an analysis, discuss strategies how to deal with them based on both methodological advices and best practices, and lastly summarize some core guidelines for applying QCA. A last segment of the course will concentrate on advanced topics and approaches in QCA such as temporal aspects, counterfactual reasoning, or combining QCA with other approaches. The workshop will be complemented by practical elements and software exercises.

Fees: Enquire via e.simon@bham.ac.uk

Instructors: Markus B. Siewert (Goethe University Frankfurt)

Link: More details

Workshop Seminar, University of Konstanz

Title: Configurational Research with QCA and CNA

Date: 26-30 September 2016

Place: University of Konstanz (Germany)

Description: This workshop seminar offers an intensive 1-week introduction to causal modelling with Qualitative Comparative Analysis (QCA) and Coincidence Analysis (CNA), the two most prominent configurational comparative methods (CCMs) of causal discovery. Participants will be guided through the nuts and bolts of configurational comparative research, cutting-edge methodological innovations, and they will also learn how to make the most of current software for QCA and CNA. From the philosophical roots of regularity theories of causation, over the procedural protocol of QCA, to the empirical analysis of causal chain structures, this seminar will go way beyond the material taught in other QCA courses, enabling participants to perform QCA in a correct and sophisticated manner. It will be shown, for example, why the vast majority of past QCA studies have run the risk of failing to find the underlying causal model, and why the conservative solution in QCA is not conservative at all. The seminar also provides an introduction to CNA-a CCM geared towards uncovering causal chains and common cause structures. Last but not least, students will learn why recent high-profile critiques discouraging the use of QCA lack traction. Individual consultation sessions will be offered in addition to help participants with the methodological aspects of their own research projects. The two instructors are among the most active researchers in the field, publishing and teaching at the forefront of configurational research. As authors of the most powerful software for QCA and CNA currently available, they also have an unrivalled familiarity with these tools, which will be made ample use of throughout the seminar.

Fees: €300 (free for students from the University of Konstanz)

Instructors: Michael Baumgartner and Alrik Thiem (University of Geneva)

Link: More details

Workshop

Title: Workshop 2: Einführung in Qualitative Comparative Analysis (QCA)

Date: 21–22 September 2016

Place: Graduate School of Politics, University of Münster (Germany)

Description: Der Kurs führt in die epistemologischen und praktischen Grundlagen von Qualitative Comparative Analysis (QCA) ein und befähigt die Teilnehmenden, selbständig eine crisp- oder fuzzy-set QCA durchzuführen. Diese vergleichsweise junge Methode kombiniert systematische softwaregeleitete Vergleiche auch eher niedriger Fallzahlen mit qualitativen Fallstudien und erklärt politische Ereignisse und Outcomes als das Ergebnis verschiedener kontextspezifischer Kombinationen von Bedingungen. Der Kurs beinhaltet eine Einführung in die Mengenlehre, die Logik notwendiger und hinreichender Bedingungen, Elemente kausaler Komplexität und die Struktur sozialwissenschaftlicher Konzepte. Anhand von anwendungsorientierten, interaktiven Übungen und einer empirischen Beispielstudie, die wir gemeinsam mithilfe der intuitiven Software fsQCA 2.5 replizieren, werden die verschiedenen Schritte vor, während und nach der QCA-Analyse erlernt. Im Laufe des Kurses werden regelmäßig gemeinsam Fragen der Validität und des Forschungsdesigns kritisch diskutiert und reflektiert. Teilnehmer und Teilnehmerinnen werden ermuntert, Skizzen ihrer Forschungsprojekte vor Beginn des Kurses einzureichen und sie zur Illustration einzelner Aspekte im Kurs besprechen zu lassen. [Language: German]

Fees: Normaler Betrag: 150€, Promovierende der GraSP und Fördervereinsmitglieder: 100€ (Registrierung per E-Mail an grasp@uni-muenster.de)

Instructors: Eva Thomann (Heidelberg University)

Link: More details

Professional Development Workshop at the 30th Annual Conference of the British Academy of Management

Title: Necessary Condition Analysis (NCA)

Date: 6 September 2016

Place: Newcastle, UK

Description: Necessary (but not sufficient) conditions widely exist in organizational research and practice including OB, HRM and Strategy. Every-day examples of necessary but not sufficient conditions are: apples are necessary but not sufficient for an apple pie; HIV is necessary but not sufficient for AIDS; intelligence is necessary but not sufficient for creativity; ability, motivation and opportunity are each necessary but not sufficient for behaviour, management commitment is necessary but not sufficient for successful change; good payment is necessary but not sufficient for work motivation, etc. If the single necessary condition is present it allows the outcome to exist but does not produce it; if the single necessary condition is absent it prevents the outcome to exist and produces guaranteed failure. Traditional (regression based) data analysis techniques fail to identify necessary conditions, even though they are frequently applied for exactly that matter. (Fs)QCA can identify only necessary conditions “in kind” (“condition X is necessary for outcome Y”), but cannot identify necessary conditions “in degree” (“level of condition X is necessary for level of outcome Y”) (Vis and Dul, 2016), Furthermore, fsQCA’s mechanistic calibration technique with the logistic membership function that is frequently used in business research, obscures necessary conditions (Dul, 2016a). Necessary Condition Analysis (NCA, Dul 2016b) is a new technique that can identify all potential necessary conditions “in kind” and “in degree” that are present in a dataset. The objective of the workshop is to discuss the NCA method, and illustrate it with examples. NCA can be used in a wide range of areas in the organizational sciences and research questions, and can complement both regression analysis, and QCA’s analysis of sufficient configurations.

Fees: None

Instructors: Jan Dul (Rotterdam School of Management, Erasmus University)

Link: More details

Professional Development Workshop at the 76th Annual Meeting of the Academy of Management (USA)

Title: Necessary Condition Analysis (NCA)

Date: 6 August 2016

Place: Anaheim, California, USA

Description: Necessary (but not sufficient) conditions widely exist in organizational research and practice including OB, HRM and Strategy. Every-day examples of necessary but not sufficient conditions are: apples are necessary but not sufficient for an apple pie; HIV is necessary but not sufficient for AIDS; intelligence is necessary but not sufficient for creativity; ability, motivation and opportunity are each necessary but not sufficient for behaviour, management commitment is necessary but not sufficient for successful change; good payment is necessary but not sufficient for work motivation, etc. If the single necessary condition is present it allows the outcome to exist but does not produce it; if the single necessary condition is absent it prevents the outcome to exist and produces guaranteed failure. Traditional (regression based) data analysis techniques fail to identify necessary conditions, even though they are frequently applied for exactly that matter. (Fs)QCA can identify only necessary conditions “in kind” (“condition X is necessary for outcome Y”), but cannot identify necessary conditions “in degree” (“level of condition X is necessary for level of outcome Y”) (Vis and Dul, 2016), Furthermore, fsQCA’s mechanistic calibration technique with the logistic membership function that is frequently used in business research, obscures necessary conditions (Dul, 2016a). Necessary Condition Analysis (NCA, Dul 2016b) is a new technique that can identify all potential necessary conditions “in kind” and “in degree” that are present in a dataset. The objective of the workshop is to discuss the NCA method, and illustrate it with examples. NCA can be used in a wide range of areas in the organizational sciences and research questions, and can complement both regression analysis, and QCA’s analysis of sufficient configurations.

Fees: None

Instructors: Jan Dul (Rotterdam School of Management, Erasmus University)

Link: More details


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